Italian Trains Jessica SpiegelIf you’re planning a trip to Italy and thinking of getting around by train, then I’ve got a book you’ll want to read. But first, I’m going to let you in on an embarrassing little travel secret.

The first time I took a train in Italy it was very nearly a disaster. Back in 2001, on my first trip to Italy, I wanted to take a day trip from Venice. I stumbled across a travel office and somehow purchased train tickets. The trip in the morning went well, but it was the return that was tricky.

It started with sudden hail storm that set an ominous tone and left me dashing through the train station and arriving at the Bologna station 1 minute before the last train to Venice departed. Run! I collapsed on the train and felt relieved until the ticket conductor came along and explained the wet ticket I was clutching in my hand was only a one way. I was never so relieved to get off a train in my life as I was late that night in Venice.

Let me tell you another secret. That’s not how train travel in Italy has to be. Keep in mind that I was 21, spoke no Italian and had never traveled abroad. But even if you’re an experienced traveler, navigating the train system in Italy can be tricky.

That’s where Jessica Spiegel’s new ebook Italy Explained: Italian Trains comes in so very handy. Think of it as your well traveled best friend telling you the ins and outs so you’re already a pro before you even set foot in a train station in Italy. With detailed information, useful images and an easy to read style, Italian Trains is an excellent resource for travelers new to taking the train in Italy who want vacation memories and stories to be about something other than train mishaps.

Even if you’re a newbie to train travel in general, you’ll feel confident taking the train in Italy after reading Jessica’s tips on everything from the difference between classes, how to tell when you need a reservation and ticket (they’re not the same!), different types of trains, reading the train schedule, booking tickets, how to choose a rail pass and what to do if a train strike happens while you’re in Italy. For those not sure on pronunciation or concerned about not knowing a binario from a biglietto, the last section of Italian Trains features a glossary of Italian train words. If you’re taking the train in Italy, download this book before you go!

For more Italy travel tips, visit Jessica’s website Italy Explained and get your copy of Italy Explained: Italian Trains here.

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